Lake Arrowhead Mountain

Sunrise Rotary Club

Remote Monitoring Made Possible

 

Remote Monitoring Made Possible

In honor of their 25th anniversary, members of the Mountain Sunrise Rotary Club have made a donation of $25,000 to Mountains Community Hospital to be used to purchase new patient monitoring equipment.

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The telemetry patient monitor will keep track of the rhythms of the heart, blood pressure, pulse, respiration and oxygen saturation on up to four patients.

Chief Operating Officer Sue Lowell said MCH will use the monitor on patients who do not present with acute cardiac problems. "They may have had cardiac disease in the past," she said, "and come in with other problems. We want to make it so we don't have to transport them."

The oxygen saturation aspect, Lowell said, is critical for patients who may be taking narcotics that depress respiration. "The machine will monitor them and set off an alarm if their oxygen saturation gets too low."

The hospital will be training all the nurses in basic cardiac arrhythmias, she said.

There will be a small unit at the patient's bedside with a cardiac monitor at the nurses station. Initially, Lowell said, they will purchase four patient monitors but can add up to 12 more if needed.

The system will also have three notifiers, the size of a pager, which will act as remote monitors for the doctor or supervisor so they don't have to watch the cardiac monitor 24 hours, seven days a week.

"This is perfect for us," Lowell said. "I'm very excited.

"I know a lot of patients who don't want to be transferred down the hill. They may have had open heart surgery but then break a leg. They can come here and be monitored."

If a patient on telemetry declines, Drs. Sami Nazzal and Syed Bokhari have said they will take charge of his or her care.

"Sue and I are the proud parents of this," Chief Executive Officer Charlie Harrison said. "Our intent is to keep more people here.

"The beauty of our hospital," Harrison added, "is our ER has doctors acting as hospitalists so there is a physician here 24/7. That's not true at all hospitals."

Lowell said she expects the monitor to be delivered by the beginning of July.